UC Nursery and Floriculture Alliance
University of California
UC Nursery and Floriculture Alliance

Spring 2014 New Publications

Compiled by Steve Tjosvold

New Publications from UC Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Weed Pest Identification and Monitoring Cards

Based on the bestselling Weeds of California and Other Western States, this is the perfect pocket-sized companion for anyone working in the field. These 48 cards cover the most common weeds, grouped into eight categories for easy identification. $25.00

Author: Joseph M. DiTomaso

Publication Number 3541

http://anrcatalog.ucdavis.edu/Details.aspx?itemNo=3541

 

Myoporum Thrips: Pest Notes for Home and Landscape

Myoporum thrips can damage or even kill Myoporum plants, flowering decorative shrubs and groundcovers native to Mauritius and popular as landscape plants in regions of California.

Authors: J. A. Bethke, L. M. Bates

Publication Number 74165

http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PDF/PESTNOTES/pnmyoporumthrips.pdf

 

Bagrada Bug: Pest Notes for Home and Landscape

Bagrada bug, a stink bug native to Africa, is now found in Southern California where it attacks vegetables and mustards as well as sweet alyssum and other ornamentals. It is especially hard on mustard seedlings. Learn to recognize and manage this pest.

Author: D.A. Reed, et al.

Publication Number 74166

http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PDF/PESTNOTES/pnbagradabug.pdf

 

Clearwing Moths: Pest Notes for Home and Landscape (Revised)

The larvae of several species of clearwing moths in the insect family Sesiidae are important wood-boring pests in landscapes. Hosts include alder, ash, birch, fir, oak, pine, poplar, sycamore, willow and stone fruit trees such as apricot, cherry, peach and plum.

Authors: J. Karlik, S. Tjosvold, and S. Dreistadt

Publication Number 7477

http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PDF/PESTNOTES/pnclearwingmoths.pdf

 

Red Imported Fire Ant: Pest Notes for Home and Landscape (Revised)

Although the red imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta) is common in 12 southern states, it is new to California and has recently been found infesting numerous residential and commercial areas in Orange, Los Angeles, Riverside, San Bernardino, and to a lesser extent, San Diego counties. The spread of these ants has largely been a result of the movement of infested soil to uninfested areas.

Authors: L. Greenberg, J. N. Kabashima

Publication Number 7487

http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PDF/PESTNOTES/pnredimportedfireant.pdf

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